The Omni Advantage

The Omni Advantage is simple – we provide the services our clients want, nothing more and nothing less. Not every market is the same, not every medical practice, bariatric surgeon, plastic surgeon, otolaryngologist, etc. is the same. Why should online marketing companies only offer you one package without understanding your needs and desires?

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Web Design

Is Your Outdated Website Helping Your Competition?

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In today’s fast-paced world, capturing your target audience quickly is imperative. If you think that your old and outdated website is doing the job, well think again. Your website is your best employee, it is working for you 24/7, 365 days a year. Would you pay an employee to stand around and possibly scare potential customers or clients away? No, so why have a website that does the same thing.

Depositphotos_5126289_l

Here are a couple key points about a website that not a lot of people think about when it comes to a properly working website.

• First you need to ask yourself these questions.
o Is a user able to identify what service or product I provide fast, without having to click to another page?
o Does my site properly explain the benefits of my service or product?
o Is my site pleasing to the eye and easy to navigate?

You can keep going and going with the amount of questions that can directly impact your business just through your website.
Having a website that is designed to capture your audience fast and properly explaining what you do is the first step to a great website. Having images and content to help explain your service or product is how you are going to capture your audience. Then providing an easy way for them to contact you, this may be through a link to a form and phone number or live chat.

Having great content and images on your site is not the only steps. Your site must also look great and function well. If a user lands on your home page and it looks like the very first website ever build, that instantly puts an idea in their head that you are old and out of date. So you want to have a fresh and exiting website to make them feel more comfortable and more likely to contact you or purchase your product. Your site must also flow, meaning that your menu and pages must make sense.

o For example, under your “Contact Us” tab you should not have a random product or service.

The design of your website’s menu and navigation needs to be simple and easy. Getting from one page to another needs to be accomplished within a couple clicks. If a user feels like they are not finding the information that they are looking for fast and with ease they are more likely to click off your site. This is not what we are looking for. We are wanting them to stay on your site for longer periods of time, the longer the time the more likely they are to convert.

• The second factor that you need to take a look at is how does your site appear on all different platforms. Meaning does your site show up too small to read on a mobile devise? Is your site formatting differently on a tablet?

A responsive website is extremely important into days’ world. Thinking that people are only going to access your website from a computer is an old and outdated way of thinking. People are looking at websites more and more on different devices ranging from Smartphones, Tablets, TV’s, Laptops and desktops of all sizes. Making sure that your website is showing up properly regardless of the device is the goal. If a user pulls up your website on a smartphone and the menu and content are not aligned, they are more than likely to click away.

I hope these couple quick but very important factors about websites helps you better understand the importance and capability of your website.

If you suddenly realized that your website needs help but you are not sure where to start, give us a call. Our professional team can help you come up with a plan to getting that amazing new website up and running and working for you. (720) 549-9222

Your Call to Action: Getting Conversions

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A CTA or, ‘Call to Action’ is an integral part of a successful medical website design and marketing plan. In the online world this will almost always be a link or button encouraging visitors to click or view in an attempt to direct them towards content or functions the website owner specifically wants fed to visitors (e.g. “Make an Appointment” or “Learn More”). All in an attempt to convert website users into clients needing the medical services you offer.

The success of a CTA is fairly easy to measure. Are visitors to your site clicking on the CTA and completing the desired functions or forms? Are new clients and leads being created by your medical practice website in the desired manner? If your CTA leads to a form to be filled out and submitted are users completing the form and submitting it?

Is your site turning visitors into customers?

If the answer is no, something is most likely wrong with the CTA on your medical practice website. In order to determine what may be wrong let’s look at proper, conversion creating CTA practices:

Draw User Attention

Does the CTA stand out? The following are some easy methods to make sure it does:

  • Size: The larger a CTA is in relation to everything else on the site and especially the elements directly surrounding it the more it will stand out.
  • Color: A CTA that is the same color or similar to the majority of the colors surrounding it and site-wide will not stand out as much as a CTA using a color that is either unique to the site, contrasts well with the surrounding colors or is a generally eye grabbing color (e.g. yellow, neons or red buttons on dark colored sites).
  • Placement Compared to Surrounding Elements: A button that is closely bordered by other elements will not stand out as much as one with white space/deadspace around it. This is an easy way to make and object stick out to the user when there is a lot of content and other elements in the surrounding area.
  • Placement on The Page: A CTA’s placement on the webpage, seperate from the surrounding elements can also have a large effect on the success of a CTA. Placement in a prominent area of the page will attract more eyes. Placement of a CTA above or below content will almost always stick out more than a button placed in the middle of content. However a button placed in the middle on content can also be made to easily stand out. A simple method would be to make the element appear to be on a higher plane then the rest of the content using 3D design techniques.
  • Placement Above the Fold: Perhaps the most important concept to keep in mind when considering CTA placement is keeping your CTA above the fold. The fold is the bottom of the browser screen when a website first loads. The area above this will be seen by more users than any other portion of the site. So obviously elements placed above the fold will receive more views and more clicks than any other elements on the site. This won’t work for all CTAs but is the best best for maximum views and clicks.

Above the Fold Example

CTAs: Words and Images

Is the intent of the CTA clear? Does it present it’s message in the best way possible? Sometimes simply changing one word can make a big difference in the number of clicks a CTA receives (e.g. “Make Your Appointment” changed to “Make My Appointment” or “Make an Appointment”). Test out different wordings to see what works best for your medical website and your needs. Sometimes including and image or icon in the CTA can also make a difference in the number of conversions you see. Icon and images provide a quick and easy method to display a CTA’s function and are often seen as more inviting than words alone.

Icon Example

In the end there isn’t one right answer for what works best. Test out some different CTAs to see what works best for you and your users. Get those conversions!

 

Re-sizing Website Images for Mobile Users With Minimum Bandwidth Usage

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With the advent of smart phones, tablets and other mobile-friendly devices the web is increasingly being viewed at a wide range of varying screen sizes. Whereas 5+ years ago the web was almost solely viewed through desktop computer screens and similarly sized laptops, the web is now increasingly viewed on devices that range from large desktop computer monitors to palm-sized smartphone screens. Recent statistics show that mobile devices make up 60% off all online traffic*.

CSS allows us to tell browsers at what width to display an image for optimal viewing based on the user’s device/screen width. However this does nothing to eliminate the fact that mobile devices will still be loading up a version of the image much larger than is needed and then re-sizing it. Leading to unnecessary bandwidth/data usage and bloat that can hinder many mobile user’s experience on a website.

How can we make sure that images on our sites are optimized and view-able for every visitor to our websites, no matter what device they are using while keeping the amount of data/bandwidth used to a minimum?

Adaptive Images

Our chosen solution is Adaptive Images, by Matt Wilcox.

A mostly server-side solution that uses a little JavaScript, the Apache 2 Web Server, PHP 5.x and the GD library. Installation only requires you modify or add an .htaccess file, installation of some PHP files to your website’s root directory, one line of JavaScript on your pages and some configuration of breakpoint variables in the PHP files to match your site’s media queries.

That’s all. Now when someone visits your website a session cookie is written that stores the visitor’s screen size in pixel dimension. Adaptive Images then intercepts any request for an image made by the browser and re-sizes the image based on the data of the session cookie to best fit the visitor’s screen width automatically. This newly created image size is cached and stored in an ai-cache file and displayed in the browser. This is all done server-side, reducing the bandwidth/data required for mobile user’s to view each image. If no cookie is found your sites responsive media queries are used to determine screen width.

This can all be implemented with no custom markup on any of your img tags. Making this solution extremely beneficial if you use a CMS or want to include it for existing markup as it is entirely non-destructive and requires no markup rewrite or modification.

The PHP file also allows for configuration of options such as image quality, breakpoints, caching a sharpening filter.

PROS:

  • Requires no custom markup
  • Works on existing sites
  • Mobile-first structure
  • Quick and easy installation
  • Meant for use with responsive design and fluid image techniques

CONS:

  • May not work with all CMS and website platforms due to the fact that it requires a combination of Apache and PHP
  • Works by intercepting image requests, so if your images are hosted elsewhere, like a content delivery service, it won’t work

This is the solution we have chosen and currently implement but there are many others that may be of use for this or different situations.

Some Other Solutions:

Picturefill

Picturefill, by Scott Jehl is a script that doesn’t require jQuery but only the picturefill.js script be included in your pages. Then include separate versions of an image optimized for different screen widths and differentiate the image versions with data-media attributes that will act just like CSS media queries.

Picturefill is a tried and true solution. However it is a bit more work as it requires multiple sizes of images and special markup that may interfere with current markup or your CMS.

HiSRC

HiSRC is a jQuery plugin by, Marc Grabanski and Christopher Schmitt that enables you to create three separate version of an image in low, medium and high resolutions that the script will then serve up depending on the Retina-readiness and network speed of the user’s device. The script will always load the lowest resolution version first and then check to see if the user’s device is appropriate for a higher resolution image, and if so it will serve up the highest resolution version appropriate.

Some drawbacks are the fact that the script uses jQuery which may be an issue for some and requires special markup that may interfere with a CMS that does not allow modification to the <img> tags.

The <picture> Element

The html5 <picture> element allows developers to skip CSS, JavaScript or solutions like those listed above to achieve fluid image re-sizing using minimum bandwidth no matter the user’s device size. By placing multiple images inside <source> tags with media queries or “hints” within your <picture> tags you can tell your browser which size image to display based on the user’s screen width or other elements using only HTML, no CSS, JavaScript or anything else required.

While this solution is the most attractive it has severe limitations at the moment as it is recognized by only a fraction of browsers. So until it receives native implementation across all browsers it is not really a viable option when serving up a large variety of visitors.

*Major Mobile Milestones in May: Apps Now Drive Half of All Time Spent on Digital

Google Announces Mobile Ranking Factors That You Should Know

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The Head of Google’s Webspam Team, Matt Cutts publishes videos for webmasters to learn more about search, and what steps are being taken to improve Google’s algorithm.  In recent videos, Matt Cutts has spent a good deal of time discussing mobile search, mobile websites, and mobile marketing.  In these videos, Matt directly address questions that are submitted to him to try to gain an understanding as to how mobile search can be optimized.  Offering some of Google’s best practices, he makes a few things clear, and if you know Google at all, you should really be listening.

The first main declaration that he made was concerning separate mobile sites, and the proper way to route traffic.  While an m-dot site (m.yourdomain.com) is possible if done correctly, Matt makes it clear that responsive website design is really the way to go to create the best user experience.  As reported by WebProNews, “Some websites use separate URLs to serve desktop and smartphone users,” explain Google’s Yoshikiyo Kato and Pierre Far. “A faulty redirect is when a desktop page redirects smartphone users to an irrelevant page on the smartphone-optimized website. A typical example is when all pages on the desktop site redirect smartphone users to the homepage of the smartphone-optimized site.”  The long and short of it is, regardless of how you build your mobile site, make sure you always keep user experience in mind.  While responsive website design is the best way to create mobile versions of your site that will deliver quality user experience, it is not impossible to properly structure an m-dot site to eliminate any confusion for the user.

Also, you may have noticed that Google has attempted to improve mobile search by using a “Nearby” function that allows geo-targeting to improve results.  This means that you can search for businesses and medical practices that are close to you, relative to your geographical location.  Have you noticed Yelp listings appearing in the top 10 search results on Google recently?  This is part of the strategy.  While many businesses, especially medical practices, have been hesitant to allow Yelp’s business practices to continue, Google has actually given Yelp more power in local search.  It’s even more important now than ever to ensure that you are listed in local directories with an emphasis on Yelp.

With an average of 30% of website traffic for medical practices coming from smart phones and tablets, can you really afford to ignore these potential patients?  If you are looking to target these potential patients with a responsive website design and local marketing, Contact Omni Medical Marketing today.

The biggest mistake to avoid while choosing a medical website designer

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The biggest step to avoid when hiring a medical website designer is pretty simple. Let your marketing company help choose your designer. While there are numerous developers and designers who do amazing work, very few take into consideration your return on investment. Sure they are capable of building an amazing looking site, but does it convert? Does it drive in the additional patients your practice needs every month? How many medical practices has this website designer worked with? Do they understand exactly what people seeking top notch medical care are looking for and what pushes their buttons to make an appointment to see you?

There are many companies out there that do very good work for plumbers, bakeries, schools and law firms for example, but do they know how to build a website that will drive traffic to your site and increase website conversion?

Often times, medical practices get caught up in the look of the website.  While this is certainly important, it is not as important as building a plan to drive traffic to the site. By combining both a preliminary marketing strategy and a world-class medical website design, medical practices can enjoy the benefits of a great looking website that converts leads into appointments.

Each and every month, a medical professional will call us after having invested a large amount of money on a complete website design.  Despite the large intial investment, months or years can go by and the website may still not generate and convert any potential patients to your practice.  This triggers the call to us.  When we review the work that was done by a previous medical website designer, we often find that many of the best practice’s for lead conversion are either done incorrectly or missing completely.  We find issues from lacking a mobile-friendly version, lacking a call to action, hidden contact information, or other serious best practice flaws that lead to lost website traffic.

There’s no doubt that our In-House Medical SEO Team can increase the traffic to a previously designed website that doesn’t focus on marketing, but will it ever reach a return on total investment that will overcome the large initial investment of a website design?  Possibly, but it leaves us with two options.  Either we turn away the business because it may never reach the potential we work so hard to achieve, or we tell the client that they have wasted a large amount of money on a website design that can’t be marketed to its full potential.  We would prefer to not have to choose from either of these options.

Building a medical website right the first time will save you money.

 

Omni Medical Marketing Announces New Creative Director in Charge of Medical Website Design

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Denver, CO (PRWEB) February 19, 2013

Omni Medical Marketing is pleased to announce the addition of Simon Willems as their new Creative Director in charge of Medical Website Design and Development. With over 10 years of experience in website design and development, Simon Willems brings his skill, experience, and leadership to Omni Medical Marketing’s design team. A University of Texas – San Antonio graduate, Simon graduated with a degree in marketing, before beginning his career as a website designer. Harnessing his attention to detail and creative energy, Simon is poised to deliver clean designs and unique user experiences, while also adhering to the best practices in web standards and accessibility.

In 2011, Simon Willems was awarded the IABC Award of Excellence for Communication Management: Electronic and Digital Communication. He uses these skills to deliver strong brand messaging with engaging website interactions.

“I am thrilled to become a member of the great team at Omni Medical Marketing,” Simon Willems explains. “With the very best medical website design team in the country, I am focused and determined to continue Omni Medical Marketing’s commitment to produce the very best medical website designs and marketing results.”

With a focus on Medical Website Design and Medical Marketing, Omni Medical Marketing has been delivering top-notch website designs for plastic surgeons, doctors, and dentists. The team at Omni has over 40 years of combined experience in marketing, search engine optimization, website design and customer service. They are dedicated to delivering a high level of service to every client, regardless of the project size or need.

With Omni Medical Marketing’s focus on delivering products that will help to grow medical practices, Simon’s experience with Mobile Website Design and Development will help Omni to cater their efforts towards meeting the needs of medical practices in an ever-changing mobile world.

Read the rest of the article at: http://www.prweb.com/releases/Omni-Medical-Marketing/Medical-Website-Design/prweb10442720.htm

Keep Your Medical Website Design Clean and Lean

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Previously, we have explored the benefits of Improving Calls to Action and optimizing traffic through A/B Testing. However, you might have wondered why we don’t just put every possible trick we have up on a page and see what sticks? Why waste time trying to perfect all of these little elements when we can shotgun test them all at once? Well, the answer is fairly simple: Less is More. Keeping your website clean and clutter-free will keep conversions high, improve website performance, and impart trust in your expertise.

Simplicity in Medical Website Design

The key to a good conversion rate on your website is to maximize content and interaction with the fewest possible number of elements. Just like with the 80/20 rule, the majority of your audience is generally only looking for a small number of items. By placing emphasis on these items and organizing your site around them, you can funnel traffic to where it is most important. Take Hick’s Law for example: it states that with the increased number of options presented to a user, the longer their decision time will be. If you overload a user with too many buttons, lists, and menus, the better the chance that they will make no decision at all and simply leave your site not knowing where to begin. Similarly, Occam’s Razor states that the simplest solution is more often than not the correct solution. Keep your layout and navigation simple, and users will be more inclined to stay on your site and visit more pages, drastically improving their conversion rate.

Hick's Law: The more options presented, the longer it takes to make a decision

Hick’s Law: The more options presented, the longer it takes to make a decision.

Medical Website Design Performance

On a technical level, keeping your site clean and clutter-free will help your page load and speed up your site. The less the browser has to render, the faster it can convey content to the user. In the mobile space, this distinction can be all the difference in the world, as users who have to wait over 4 seconds for a page to load are overwhelmingly likely to exit your site altogether. In fact, stats show that 61% of users who visit mobile unfriendly sites are likely to leave and visit a competitor’s site instead.

Statistic: 61% of internet users who visit a mobile unfriendly site are likely to leave to a competitor’s site.

Statistic: 61% of internet users who visit a mobile unfriendly site are likely to leave to a competitor’s site.

Medical Website Design Expertise

Clean design also imparts on your website visitors that you are an expert in your field. How so? When we are in the process of making a purchase decision, we weigh a variety of options including those called “surrogate indicators of quality.” Research has shown that people are more likely to buy more expensive versions of the same product because of a perceived increase in value (it costs more, therefore it must be better). Much in the same way, relaying content in a clear, straight-forward manner, with only a handful of incidental elements such as forms and Calls to Action, tells your visitor that you know precisely what matters, cutting out the fluff. This seemingly innocuous difference is an indicator of the quality of your services. In your audience’s mind, a good medical website design means a good medical professional.

If you’re ready to take the editor’s pen to your site, contact Omni Medical Marketing for a Free Medical Website Analysis where we will evaluate your site and give you recommendations for improvement at absolutely no cost. We think you will quickly see why the knowledge and insight behind every Omni Medical Marketing website makes them the best in the industry.

How Does A/B Testing Help Your Medical Practice Website Design?

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What is A/B & Multivariate Testing?

A/B & Multivariate Testing may seem like a complicated subject, but it’s actually pretty simple. Basically, with A/B Testing, websites can serve up two different forms of content to track which version performs better. Not sure if an orange or a purple button will better entice users to click on it? With A/B Testing, you can remove the guesswork, turning hunches into facts, and know once and for all. Using this method of testing can greatly increase key metrics for your medical website design including leads, registrations, downloads, and, most importantly, revenue. So how does it work?

Let’s take an example. Almost all major news sites today use A/B Testing on headlines to see which version drives more traffic. First, two different headlines are chosen, the A (base) headline and the B (test case) headline. Both are then applied to an A/B Testing Tool which will serve up the two versions equally, at random, to different visitors. Once a statistically significant variation in results is determined for which headline users were likely to click on more, the A/B Test concludes the winner and scraps the alternate, losing version. Multivariate Testing is slightly different in that you can apply more than one test case, serving up a wide variety of different versions. The hard data and science behind the test, regardless of which style of testing, definitively shows which headline is objectively better for generating more visitors to the site.

Using A/B (Split) Testing can help determine which Call to Action is best

Example: Using A/B (Split) Testing can help determine which Call to Action is best.

The applications of A/B Testing in medical website design are extensive. With the primary goal of your website being patient lead generation, there are many important avenues to optimize such as capturing visitor’s information via forms, encouraging direct phone calls or email, and conveying physician expertise. So what kind of A/B tests could you run with this in mind? Here are just a few examples:

1)      Placement and styling of a phone number

2)      Number of fields in a contact form

3)      Before/after picture selection

4)      Type of home page banner image

5)      Call to Action button style

6)      Video introduction versus pictures with text

As you can see, there are a number of different ways to go about optimizing your site for better conversion rates. Do you know what types of changes you can make to get your medical website working better? To get started with A/B Testing and see how Omni Medical Marketing can improve your medical website, contact us today!

Call 800-549-0170.

Medical Website Development Best Practices – Cross-Browser Compatability

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In the early days of the medical website design and development, there was only one popular web browser: Netscape Navigator. Creating websites that worked for everyone was pretty simple, as most everyone (around 90%) viewed websites using the same web browser. Designers didn’t have to ask, “How will this website look on a cell phone?” or, “What happens if my visitors use an old web browser?”.

That all changed when Bill Gates finally decided that the internet wasn’t really a fad. Microsoft unleashed Internet Explorer in 1995, initiating the first “browser war”. Netscape and Microsoft competed for market share, with Internet Explorer peaking at 95% of the market in 2002. The competition between browsers caused a lot of problems for medical website designers, cost businesses a lot of money, and slowed down innovation for almost a decade.

The Feature War

The fight between Microsoft (IE) and Netscape (NN) wasn’t fought on Madison Avenue. Instead, the two companies competed by introducing new browser features. Each feature was intended to either enhance the user experience or to create new opportunities for web designers. One example was <blink>, which allowed a designer to create text that flashed on and off. This was a Netscape feature, and wasn’t available in Internet Explorer. In response, Microsoft introduced <marquee>, which allowed designers to create text that moved across the screen, horizontally or vertically. This feature wasn’t available in Netscape Navigator.

As you can imagine, this created chaos for medical website designers. As each browser introduced more unique features, designers were forced to make some difficult choices. The most difficult choice of all should have been the easiest.

Either/Or

If a designer’s client wanted some blinking text, the designer created a website that worked best in Netscape. If the client wanted scrolling text, the designer worked to make sure the website looked great in Internet Explorer. No big deal, right? WRONG. Clients didn’t want to cater to only a portion of web surfers…they wanted their websites to look and act the same way, no matter what browser they viewed it with. Designers, of course, couldn’t comply. They couldn’t make Internet Explorer use <blink> or make Netscape use <marquee>.

The solution? Designers began creating separate websites for each group of visitors. Surfers using IE would see a website that worked for them, and surfers using NN would get their own website as well. Problem solved!

Not really. Designers like to get paid, and they don’t like making two websites when one will do. They began to put pressure on browser manufacturers to work together.

It’s 2013 Already

Fast-forward to today. This problem has been solved, hasn’t it? Don’t all browsers work the same way?

Not really. There are somewhere close to 40 popular web browsers, sometimes with a half-dozens different versions being used. The best medical website designers know how their websites will look in each, which requires both some homework and some testing. Your website looks fine in Firefox 10, but is that on a PC, on a Mac, or on Linux? They’re not the same, and an effective web designer knows this. How many of your website’s visitors use Flock, or Konqueror, or Safari? The same website might look drastically different with each, and might even be broken.

But wait…there’s more! How does your website look on a new Windows 8 smartphone? The iPhone 5? The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.0? The Google Nexus 7? Does your website break on the newest version of Amazon’s Kindle, or is it okay? Can you afford to lose revenue with those visitors?

What Now?

Nobody in their right mind would consider making different websites for 40 different browsers (or even just 5), yet we must make sure your website works for everybody. This is where “cross-browser compatability” comes in. There are lots of different ways to create a website, and every designer has a slightly different approach. Set aside a designer’s style and personal preferences, and what you have left is their ‘best practices’ for making websites. The same code must work for all of your visitors, provide them with an effective call to action, and allow them to contact you easily. To accomplish this, your website must be written with all of those different web browsers in mind.

This doesn’t happen automatically. Here at Omni Medical Marketing, our medical website design team is constantly learning. We keep up on trends and best practices, and we’re on the lookout for new and innovative ways to future-proof your website. For example, see responsive medical website design. If your current medical marketing company doesn’t do the same, your website may be out of date in less than one year. The internet landscape changes that quickly, and you don’t want to be left behind. Give us a call. We can help.

Call 800-549-0170.

Medical Website Best Practices: Lose Weight

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Today’s super high-speed bandwidth connections have created a false sense of security for modern designers.

Before the days of “fat pipe”, website designers spent a lot of time worrying about download speeds. After all, everyone on the internet used a dial-up connection. They obsessed over the size of their images, cut unnecessary code, and measured the amount of time it took to load their web pages.

That all changed in a hurry. With the advent of broadband internet, designers suddenly (over just a few years) had the freedom and flexibility to create almost anything online, with little reason to even think about speed. Those were the glory days of big Flash animations and splashy, image-rich websites. Today, desktop computing in the first world has progressed even farther. It’s an immersive, media-rich experience. Instead of downloading web pages and videos at around 6MB per hour, surfers can now stream HD movies at close to 1,700MB per hour.

Everything old is new again

It’s almost 2013. The internet has been around for more than 40 years. The World Wide Web is two decades old. Once again, website designers need to obsess over speed. While traditional internet connections are faster than they’ve ever been, “code monkeys” must go back in time and think small. Why, you ask? Mobile.

Smartphones are changing the web. Most web jockeys don’t realize it yet, but their work needs to change as well. The old days of slow connections and confusing technology are back, and a lot of professionals aren’t keeping up. A lot of web designers (and their clients) are going to get left behind. At this time, over half of U.S. cell phones are smartphones, and almost 30% of Americans own a web-enabled tablet. This number is expected to rise dramatically in 2013. I’ve seen the evidence first-hand, at my local AT&T store. My 13 year-old son is getting a cell phone for Christmas. How many “dumb phones” does AT&T have for him to choose from? THREE. Every other phone offered is a smartphone. You can’t even buy a smartphone and use it like a dumb phone…as soon as the smartphone connects to a cell tower, you’re automatically enrolled in an expensive data plan. When regular old cell phones leave the market completely, mobile computing will truly skyrocket.

Because of the explosive growth of smart devices like smartphones, iPads, Kindles, and the rest, the web is being consumed differently today than ever before. Desktop computers are blazing fast, but cellphones are not. That cool Flash animation you had built for your website doesn’t even work on a lot of devices. Where it does work, it takes forever to download. It’s time for a change, and smart web designers are looking to the past for guidance.

Web design must be thoughtful

More than at any time in the history of the web, designers must think carefully about their work. They really need to consider every aspect of web surfing before writing any code. Should you use HTML 4, or XHTML 1.0, or HTML 5? Should you use any CSS 3 at all? Will that cool javascript thing you used last year work on the new iPad Mini? These kinds of question are increasingly important, especially during a difficult economic period. Nobody wants to spend top dollar for a great website and find that it looks nasty on the hottest new phones.

Did you know that approximately 25% of traffic to medical practice websites comes from a mobile device? If your website doesn’t look great for them, you’re losing money. Omni Medical Marketing specializes in the thoughtful application of best-practice web tech including Responsive Medical Website Design. We can transform your website from a web loser into a web winner in no time at all.

How to Decrease Page Load Time for Your Medical Website Design | Go Back in Time

Here are some practical tips for creating websites that rock on mobile devices. They’re a combination of old-school techniques and universal principles that every designer needs to keep in mind:

  • Write clean code. Simply put, less is more. At Omni Medical Marketing, we recommend moving to HTML 5 to future-proof your website.
  • Use fewer images. Designers can now use CSS3 and web fonts to reduce the number of images on a web page. Box shadows, text shadows, borders, gradients, and fancy fonts are just the beginning…and each element that uses CSS3 is one less image that mobile visitors have to wait for.
  • Use smaller images. That high-quality image on your home page doesn’t work for cell phones. At Omni Medical Marketing, we can show big images for desktops and smaller, mobile-specific images for cell phones and tablets.
  • Put content first…again. High-speed connections allow designers to substitute flashy graphics for quality content. Mobile surfers are looking at your website for information, not entertainment. Let Omni Medical Marketing help you measure the effectiveness of your current website and plan for the present and the future by getting back to basics.
  • Responsive, not “m-dot”. Some web companies may try to sell you a separate, mobile-specific website. Don’t fall for it. They’ll make a lot of money on those websites, but you won’t. The best practice is to make your website work well for everyone without creating multiple sites for different devices. Who wants to update two websites instead of one?

Take a tip from a web guy who’s been around the block: don’t let just anyone work on your website. There’s too much at stake. You need thoughtful, industry-leading professionals to help you navigate the constantly-changing internet. We promise to make the process as painless as possible.

If you would like to see how to put these tactics to work in your Medical Website Design as part of a Medical Marketing plan, contact Omni Medical Marketing today. Let us start improving your conversions now.

Call 800-549-0170.